Healthy Living

Ontario government announces new programs for seniors in their communities

Apr 13th, 2018 | By

In a recent press release The Ontario Ministry of Seniors Affairs announced that nearly 250 new and innovative projects that will help seniors stay active and engaged are coming to communities across the province – part of Ontario’s plan to support care, create opportunity, and make life more affordable for seniors and their families. Minister
[continue reading…]



Your legacy for better healthcare

Apr 13th, 2018 | By

Sometimes, your kindness can touch the lives of others in ways you could have never imagined.  During your lifetime you’ve probably supported charitable organizations that are important to you, and with those gifts, you’ve helped to make your community, and our world, a better place. If you’ve supported one of the hospitals in our region,
[continue reading…]



Living with heart disease: How to take charge of your health

Apr 13th, 2018 | By

By Lisa M. Petsche Heart disease is a leading cause of death for adults in Canada. Coronary artery disease (CAD) (also known as arteriosclerosis or hardening of the arteries) is the most common type. CAD is caused by accumulation in the coronary arteries of fatty deposits called plaques. This results in narrowing within the arteries,
[continue reading…]



Beat the cold and pamper yourself

Jan 26th, 2018 | By

By Lisa M. Petsche The cold temperatures and limited daylight of winter keep many people indoors and at home more often than they would like. The result for some is a case of the winter blues. Here are some tips to help you get past them. Find little things that cheer you • Treat yourself
[continue reading…]



What’s the difference between a heart attack, heart failure, and stroke?

Jan 26th, 2018 | By

By Women’s Health Matters  Heart attack, heart failure and stroke are different conditions that affect people in different ways. Dr. Paula Harvey, director of the cardiovascular research program at Women’s College Hospital, explains the difference. A heart attack happens when the heart is not getting enough oxygenated blood, usually because one of the major blood
[continue reading…]



Ottawa area hospitals take measures to protect against winter viruses

Dec 14th, 2017 | By

‘Tis the season for influenza and gastroenteritis (stomach flu).  We have been told that there will be higher levels of virus activity this season, and  a joint message from the Ottawa area hospitals: Bruyère Continuing Care, the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Hôpital Montfort, The Ottawa Hospital, The Royal Mental Health Care and Queensway Carleton
[continue reading…]



Holiday help for caregivers

Dec 14th, 2017 | By

Planning ahead can keep stress in check By Lisa M. Petsche The holiday season is a hectic time for many of us. It’s even more challenging when you’re caring for a chronically ill or frail relative, a demanding role at the best of times. To keep stress manageable and make your holidays more meaningful, follow
[continue reading…]



Flu shot helps us stay healthy and active

Dec 14th, 2017 | By

(NC) As the weather gets colder, people make certain changes — dressing warmer, drinking hot beverages and staying healthy by getting the flu shot. Getting the flu shot boosts your defense against the illness. Before each flu season, a vaccine is developed to protect against the most common, expected flu viruses. That’s why it’s important
[continue reading…]



Breast awareness: no one knows your breasts as well as you do

Oct 13th, 2017 | By

By Women’s Health Matters For most women at average risk, Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) recommends a mammogram every two years from age 50 to age 74 to screen for breast cancer. Women ages 40 to 49 are advised to talk to their doctor about mammography to decide if they would benefit from screening. However, breast
[continue reading…]



Fewer than one in five Canadian women have breast reconstruction after mastectomy

Oct 13th, 2017 | By

By The Canadian Cancer Society An estimated 26,300 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in Canada this year, making it the most common cancer in Canada. Of those, about 6,000 women have mastectomies every year. Yet surprisingly, fewer than one in five (16%) of women undergo breast reconstruction after mastectomy, which is less than
[continue reading…]