Explore parts of Canada’s oceans for the first time

Sep 14th, 2017 | By | Category: Featured, Home

(NC) Despite space being the “final frontier,” our oceans are an even bigger mystery. We often hear that we know more about the surface of the moon or Mars than the ocean floor. In fact, 95 per cent of the world’s oceans are unexplored.

Oceana, an advocacy group focused on ocean conservation, has been conducting expeditions around the world for more than a decade, discovering marine habitats off the coasts of Europe, the Philippines, Chile and the United States. Now, it’s Canada’s turn.

Alexandra Cousteau—filmmaker and granddaughter of world-renowned explorer Jacques-Yves Cousteau— joins Oceana Canada and leading Canadian scientists to explore never-before-seen areas of the sea floor in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The expedition uses some of the most advanced tools in deep-sea exploration to document the incredible diversity of life.

This is the most in-depth visual exploration of the seafloor of the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada’s history. For the first time, anyone can take part through a 24-hour live broadcast – from a first-hand view of the seafloor, to daily life on a research vessel and scientists at work in the control room.

According to Cousteau, it’s only through exploring our oceans that we can protect them.

“This expedition continues a legacy that traces its roots back to my grandfather. The expedition team shares the passion that my family has had for generations and are using the latest technology to make research and ocean exploration a reality for all ocean enthusiasts.”

The Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Gulf of Maine are some of the most complex marine ecosystems in the world. They are rich in biodiversity, home to such species as cold-water coral, crusteans like lobster and groundfish like Atlantic cod. They also serve as important feeding grounds for species like endangered right whales and sea turtles.

To view behind-the-scenes expedition footage, visit oceana.ca/expeditions.

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